1. Stop looking for the ‘right’ career, and start looking for a job. Any job. Forget about what you like. Focus on what’s available. Get yourself hired. Show up early. Stay late. Volunteer for the scut work. Become indispensable. You can always quit later, and be no worse off than you are today. But don’t waste another year looking for a career that doesn’t exist. And most of all, stop worrying about your happiness. Happiness does not come from a job. It comes from knowing what you truly value, and behaving in a way that’s consistent with those beliefs. Many people today resent the suggestion that they’re in charge of the way the feel…. What you do, who you’re with, and how you feel about the world around you, is completely up to you.

    — Mike Rowe (via jenmyers)

  2. Figured i should start posting my daily drawing on my own tumblog.
I’ve started since beginning of 2014. Earlier ones see at group blog. 

    Figured i should start posting my daily drawing on my own tumblog.

    I’ve started since beginning of 2014. Earlier ones see at group blog

  3. explore-blog:

    Cal Newport on why “follow your passion” is terrifically bad advice – before we can follow it, we first have to find it.

    Pair with how to find your purpose and do what you love.

  4. nevver:

Teach us to outgrow our madness

http://www.amazon.com/dp/080215185X/ref=cm_sw_su_dp

    nevver:

    Teach us to outgrow our madness

    http://www.amazon.com/dp/080215185X/ref=cm_sw_su_dp

  5. Stowe Boyd: Ito's Nine Principles →

    stoweboyd:

    Ito: There are nine or so principles to work in a world like this:

    1. Resilience instead of strength, which means you want to yield and allow failure and you bounce back instead of trying to resist failure.
    2. You pull instead of push. That means you pull the resources from the network as you need them, as opposed to centrally stocking them and controlling them.
    3. You want to take risk instead of focusing on safety.
    4. You want to focus on the system instead of objects.
    5. You want to have good compasses not maps.
    6. You want to work on practice instead of theory. Because sometimes you don’t why it works, but what is important is that it is working, not that you have some theory around it.
    7. It[’s] disobedience instead of compliance. You don’t get a Nobel Prize for doing what you are told. Too much of school is about obedience, we should really be celebrating disobedience.
    8. It’s the crowd instead of experts.
    9. It’s a focus on learning instead of education.

    We’re still working on it, but that is where our thinking is headed.

    A few thoughts:

    The ‘risk/safety’ dichotomy is also ‘be biased toward speculative experiments that allow deeper understanding of implications, rather than optimizing around lowering disruption and short-term costs’.

    One thing missing is the principle related to resilience: ‘go slow to go fast’. This means you need to step out of the flow of today’s operational frenzy to take new actions. In martial arts, this means you must relax your muscles and nerves to respond or attack quickly.

    ‘You don’t get a Nobel Prize for doing what you are told’ is priceless.

    (Source: brucesterling)

  6. The challenge of leadership is to be strong, but not rude; be kind, but not weak; be bold, but not bully; be thoughtful, but not lazy; be humble, but not timid; be proud, but not arrogant; have humor, but without folly.

    —  Jim Rohn, on Leadership

  7. If you want to build a ship, don’t drum up people to collect wood and don’t assign them tasks and work, but rather teach them to long for the endless immensity of the sea.

    — Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, author of Le Petit Prince. (via zachklein)

  8. People often ask me, ‘what’s gonna happen?’ And the answer is it’s up to you. You have to decide what will happen. This isn’t something playing out on a stage somewhere where big giants fight each other and you get to sit and watch popcorn. This is a fight you can join in.

    — Aaron Swarts (@aaronsw) via  http://warfortheweb.com/blog/2013/01/excerpts-from-aaron-swartz-interview-july-10-2012/

  9. I would define intellectual elegance as a mind that is continually refining itself with education and knowledge. Intellectual elegance is the opposite of intellectual vulgarity.

    — Happy 82nd birthday, legendary designer Massimo Vignelli, creator of the iconic NYC subway map. (via explore-blog)